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I love to sew

I love to sew

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Weeping and gnashing of teeth



The phrase "(there shall be) weeping and gnashing of teeth" (in the original Greek ὁ κλαυθμὸς καὶ ὁ βρυγμὸς τῶν ὀδόντων) appears seven times in the New Testament as a description of the torments of the damned in Hell. Taken from Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia, I must be damned and in Hell. I am a Christian but every time I think of using my pinking shears, I know there will be praying, weeping, gnashing of teeth, cursing, lip biting and more. Why, oh why, are they such a pain to work with?

No matter what I do I can not cut more than an inch or two before they start gnawing up my fabric. Many years ago I used them all they time and seemed to cut perfectly. I've had mine sharpened oiled, hands laid upon and still the same results. Today I was simply trying to cut interfacing so that I could interface the hem of a dress with no tell-tale signs of the edge. I did manage to get it done but now I am tired and spent and frankly, I need a drink. Is there some magic formula to getting them to cut cleanly?

16 comments:

  1. I know you said that you've had them sharpened but that's what it sounds like they need. They are harder to sharpen than regular shears so the person has to really know what they are doing.

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    1. Kelly I have three pairs and no success with either!

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  2. Or it's time to purchase a new pair! Mine are Gingher and I find that I have to take smaller bites with them to work well.

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    1. If I take smaller bites they do work but WTH. What about me gave you the impression that I'm PATIENT?? LOL

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  3. Try a different brand, perhaps? I recently had to buy a new pair of pinking shears. When I got them home, all they would do is chew up the fabric. I returned them to Hancock's where I purchased them, and the cashier opened another pair to make sure they worked - they work well. I've had a couple dud pairs over the years.

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  4. I recommend a pinking blade for your rotary cutter instead. I have one and I quite like it!

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  5. One thing I found out (from somewhere?) is that you should use pinking shears only on the very edges of the fabric, so that maybe they are not even making the full zigzag shape. I don't know if that would make any difference or not.

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  6. I have a pair of Fiskars and haven't had a problem like that. I mostly use them to cut the ends of petersham or the lower edge of a back stay. As others have said, you may need a new pair or use the pinking blade on a rotary cutter.

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    1. Hey, I think I have one...somewhere. Am going to have to try and locate it.

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  7. I can be of no help at all. I don't know where my pinking shears are - and I don't even care! Can you tell I've given up on them?

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  8. DH gave me a pair many yrs ago when the expense was an issue for us. I never could use the damn things properly, had the same problems you have. Now I just cherish them as a thoughtful gift and use a rotary blade.

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  9. I too have a pair of Fiskar's that I have never, knock on wood!!, had a problem with. But I like the idea of the pinking blade for a rotary cutter.

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  10. I use mine all the time. I have some Fiskars. It's a matter of making sure the person who sharpens them know's what they are doing. Anywhooo, Oil the screw and that will loosen them up a tad if they are tight. Use the smooth side of the top scissor as a guide for straight cutting and slow down if you are cutting fast. Sounds like the pair you have are dull. Reinvest in a new pair and get rid of the others (so you are not tempeted to give it one last try). Good Luck and I hope this helps!

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  11. I also have Fiskars, and have not had an issue. It could be the brand. I have not tried the ones for a rotary cutter but that really sounds like a good suggestion.

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